6th Driving Government Performance

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Case Method

The Complete Learning Experience

Content

The program’s content and cases are built upon four main areas: leadership, strategy, motivation and results.
Program’s content

Leadership

The key element in leading a public agency – what it takes to improve performance – is a leadership team.This group of top executives shares the responsibilities and tasks of leadership. They articulate a mission, foster new strategies, establish targets, generate resources, motivate people and teams, reward success, and create an environment in which every individual feels a personal responsibility for the agency’s performance.

Strategy

Public executives need a strategy to better accomplish established goals. They must determine how to improve performance and set out the approach required to achieve it. Strategy isn’t just about means. It is about employing the best means to achieve results, because rethinking results and means can create consequences that citizens truly value.

Motivation

Improved performance doesn’t just happen. People make it happen. However, direction and motivation is needed to achieve an improvement in performance. People need leaders who can establish an agenda that focuses on results, and who can convince individuals and teams to pursue these targets energetically and intelligently.

Results

Our public institutions and top administrators are required to come up with results. Good intentions, analysis, planning, systems and processes are not enough. They can help, but the bottom line is this: what really counts are results.

Methodology

The program will use the case method to discuss real problems that public organizations face. The proposed methodology aims to establish a bidirectional process of permanent learning, which must be relevant to the main matters of interest at all times. During the program, participants study each case and pool their ideas within small working teams. Finally, everyone participates in a general session led by the professor, who steers the discussion, evaluates the different alternatives recommended by the students and outlines their potential consequences.

The professor simultaneously introduces theoretical concepts and tools that round out the students’ learning. The repertory of cases employed by the faculty focuses on the basic managerial tasks that continually confront senior public executives as they seek to improve performance along with results in the fulfillment of their responsibilities.