Education for Jobs Initiative

Defining the professional competencies of tomorrow

The “Education for Jobs Initiative” is a multidisciplinary project aimed at understanding the evolution of the professional competencies that companies – which require the professional services of people – will need in the coming years.

Education and the development of professional competencies are essential factors in employment and unemployment, especially among young people. Educational institutions play an important role in this process, but it is companies that define the competencies needed and that take the ultimate decision on hiring.

We believe companies must play a key role in the process of defining competencies and capacities that the educational model must cover to ensure jobs for the future. Companies are the ones that possess the knowledge of the profiles and training they will need in the future.

This initiative is aimed at helping companies define and systemize these future professional competencies and at embarking on a dialogue with educational institutions to improve the quality of educational processes, and, ultimately, the employability of young people.

 

Our research

Education is one of the main factors behind youth unemployment. Our society requires an educational system that is high quality and agile, and capable of responding to the changing needs of companies and society itself. Professional competencies have changed at a much faster pace than the educational system’s ability to respond, which has created a clear gap between the capacities required and the jobs on offer. According to the OECD (2017), in Spain’s case this gap in capacities affects more than 33% of workers.

The future of work requires understanding the knowledge and capacities that companies will need in the coming years. Companies are ultimately the ones who create jobs and they play a fundamental role in defining the professional competencies that must be developed to guarantee the employability of young people in the future. Workers with lower training levels suffer higher unemployment rates than those with medium levels and, above all, than those with high professional or university-level studies. In Spain, the difference in employment levels in 2018 between young people with a high level of studies and those with a low level was 32 percentage points. This research presents the opinions and experiences of 53 major companies operating in Spain regarding their outlook on creating jobs and on the professional competencies required by these companies to cover their needs.

Team